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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
Kant
 
  A lie is the abandonment and, as it were, the annihilation of the dignity of man.  1
  A man who has tasted with profound enjoyment the pleasure of agreeable society will eat with a greater appetite than he who rode horseback for two hours. An amusing lecture is as useful for health as the exercise of the body.  2
  Beneficence is a duty. He who frequently practices it, and sees his benevolent intentions realized, at length comes really to love him to whom he has done good.  3
  Both love of mankind, and respect for their rights are duties; the former however is only a conditional, the latter an unconditional, purely imperative duty, which he must be perfectly certain not to have transgressed who would give himself up to the secret emotions arising from benevolence.  4
  Earnestness and sincerity are synonymous.  5
  Enthusiasm is always connected with the senses, whatever be the object that excites it. The true strength of virtue is serenity of mind, combined with a deliberate and steadfast determination to execute her laws. That is the healthful condition of the moral life; on the other hand, enthusiasm, even when excited by representations of goodness, is a brilliant but feverish glow which leaves only exhaustion and languor behind.  6
  Even a man’s exact imitation of the song of the nightingale displeases us when we discover that it is a mimicry, and not the nightingale.  7
  Freedom is alone the unoriginated birthright of man; it belongs to him by force of his humanity, and is in dependence on the will and coaction of every other, in so far as this consists with every other person’s freedom.  8
  Have patience awhile; slanders are not long-lived. Truth is the child of Time; erelong she shall appear to vindicate thee.  9
  If man makes himself a worm he must not complain when he is trodden on.  10
  Procrastination is hardly more evil than grasping impatience.  11
  Seek not the favor of the multitude; it is seldom got by honest and lawful means. But seek the testimony of few; and number not voices, but weigh them.  12
  Sincerity is the indispensable ground of all conscientiousness, and by consequence of all heartfelt religion.  13
 
 
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