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C.N. Douglas, comp.  Forty Thousand Quotations: Prose and Poetical.  1917.
 
J. F. Boyes
 
  Friends should be very delicate and careful in administering pity as medicine, when enemies use the same article as poison.  1
  If, in instructing a child, you are vexed with it for a want of adroitness, try, if you have never tried before, to write with your left hand, and then remember that a child is all left hand.  2
  It is only with the best judges that the highest works of art would lose none of their honor by being seen in their rudiments.  3
  It is vain to be always looking toward the future and never acting toward it.  4
  It would be a great advantage to some schoolmasters if they would steal two hours a day from their pupils and give their own minds the benefit of the robbery.  5
  Nobility of birth is like a cipher; it has no power in itself, like wealth or talent; but it tells with all the power of a cipher when added to either of the other two.  6
  Sombre thoughts and fancies often require a little real soil or substance to flourish in; they are the dark pine-trees which take root in, and frown over the rifts of the scathed and petrified heart, and are chiefly nourished by the rain of unavailing tears, and the vapors of fancy.  7
  Strict punctuality is perhaps the cheapest virtue which can give force to an otherwise utterly insignificant character.  8
  There are some books and characters so pleasant, or rather which contain so much that is pleasant, that criticism is perplexed or silent. The hounds are perpetually at fault among the sweet-scented herbs and flowers that grow at the base of Etna.  9
  There is scarcely a man who is not conscious of the benefits which his own mind has received from the performance of single acts of benevolence. How strange that so few of us try a course of the same medicine!  10
  Those who, from the desire of our perfection, have the keenest eye for our faults generally compensate for it by taking a higher view of our merits than we deserve.  11
  Violence in the voice is often only the death-rattle of reason in the throat.  12
  We should remember that it is quite as much a part of friendship to be delicate in its demands as to be ample in its performances.  13
  Where there is much general deformity nature has often, perhaps generally, accorded some one bodily grace even in over-measure. So, no doubt, with the intellect and disposition, only it is frequently less apparent, and we give ourselves but little trouble to discover it.  14
  Where we find echoes, we generally find emptiness and hollowness; it is the contrary with the echoes of the heart.  15
 
 
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