Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Plato
 
  Health, beauty, vigour, riches, and all the other things called goods, operate equally as evils to the vicious and unjust as they do as benefits to the just.
Plato.    
  1
 
  There is nothing so delightful as the hearing or the speaking of truth. For this reason there is no conversation so agreeable as that of the man of integrity, who hears without any intention to betray, and speaks without any intention to deceive.
Plato.    
  2
 
  As knowledge without justice ought to be called cunning rather than wisdom; so a mind prepared to meet danger, if excited by its own eagerness and not the public good, deserves the name of audacity rather than of courage.
Plato.    
  3
 
  All things are in fate, yet all things are not decreed by fate.
Plato.    
  4
 
  Princes are never without flatterers to seduce them, ambition to deprave them, and desires to corrupt them.
Plato.    
  5
 
  A state would be happy where philosophers were kings or kings were philosophers.
Plato.    
  6
 
 
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