Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Benjamin H. Smart
 
  It is a passive, not an active, power…. It is not acquirable, and it can no otherwise be assisted than by the suggestions sought for or presented. In some degree it is inherent in every man not being entirely an idiot…. In itself, as an ultimate principle of our nature, it is never erroneous; what we call wrong conclusions being conclusions obtained by some artificial process taking the place of reason,… or they are conclusions just in themselves, and wrong only as regards the assumptions or suggestions out of which they arise. It is a power which may, however, be lost.
Benjamin H. Smart.    
  1
 
  The affectation of using French and Italian words in English speech was a national failing as far back as the times of Elizabeth, and continues to this day.
Benjamin H. Smart.    
  2
 
  It may be said that there are few or no synonymous words in a language, but many that are paronymous.
Benjamin H. Smart.    
  3
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors