Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Sir James Stephen
 
  They show that our forefathers had not learned our modern affectation of a liberalism so cosmopolitan as to shrink from celebrating in the loftiest strains the greatness, the glory, and the happiness of England.
Sir James Stephen.    
  1
 
  History is the complement of poetry.
Sir James Stephen.    
  2
 
  Used with due abstinence, hope acts as a healthful tonic; intemperately indulged, as an enervating opiate. The visions of future triumph which at first animate exertion, if dwelt upon too intensely, will usurp the place of the stern reality; and noble objects will be contemplated, not for their own inherent worth, but on account of the day-dreams they engender. Thus hope, aided by imagination, makes one man a hero, another a somnambulist, and a third a lunatic; while it renders them all enthusiasts.
Sir James Stephen.    
  3
 
  A well-judging man will open his trunk-line of study in such a direction that, while habitually adhering to it, he may enjoy a ready access to such other fields of knowledge as are most nearly related to it.
Sir James Stephen.    
  4
 
 
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