Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
William Wake
 
  The only thing which can endear religion to your practice will be to raise your affections above this world.
William Wake.    
  1
 
  It is our great unhappiness, when any calamities fall upon us, that we are uneasy and dissatisfied.
William Wake.    
  2
 
  Let us not mistake God’s goodness, nor imagine because he smites us, that we are forsaken of him.
William Wake.    
  3
 
  If we repent seriously, submit contentedly, and serve him faithfully, afflictions shall turn to our advantage.
William Wake.    
  4
 
  Charity taken in its largest extent is nothing else but the sincere love of God and our neighbour.
William Wake.    
  5
 
  You must not only acknowledge to God that you are a sinner, but must particularly enumerate the kinds of sin whereof you know yourself guilty.
William Wake.    
  6
 
  A true and humble sense of your own unworthiness will not suffer you to rise up to that confidence which some men unwarrantably pretend to, nay, unwarrantably require of others.
William Wake.    
  7
 
  A confident dependence ill grounded creates such a negligence as will certainly ruin us in the end.
William Wake.    
  8
 
  Though we live never so long, we are still surprised; we put the evil day far from us, and then it catches us unawares, and we tremble at the prospect.
William Wake.    
  9
 
  Let us live like those who expect to die, and then we shall find that we feared death only because we were unacquainted with it.
William Wake.    
  10
 
  There is nothing in the world more generally dreaded, and yet less to be feared, than death: indeed, for those unhappy men whose hopes terminate in this life, no wonder if the prospect of another seems terrible and amazing.
William Wake.    
  11
 
  Death sets us safely on shore in our long-expected Canaan, where there are no temptations, no danger of falling, but eternal purity and immortal joys secure our innocence and happiness forever.
William Wake.    
  12
 
  Were it possible that the near approaches of eternity, whether by a mature age, a crazy constitution, or a violent sickness, should amaze so many, had they duly considered?
William Wake.    
  13
 
  That faith which is required of us is then perfect when it produces in us a fiduciary assent to whatever the gospel has revealed.
William Wake.    
  14
 
  To persevere in any evil course makes you unhappy in this life, and will certainly throw you into everlasting torments in the next.
William Wake.    
  15
 
 
 
  To persevere in any evil course makes you unhappy in this life.
William Wake.    
  16
 
  Nothing hath proved more fatal to that due preparation for another life than our unhappy mistake of the nature and end of this.
William Wake.    
  17
 
  God proves us in this life, that he may the more plenteously reward us in the next.
William Wake.    
  18
 
  So many accidents may deprive us of our lives, that we can never say that he who neglects to secure his salvation to-day may without danger put it off to to-morrow.
William Wake.    
  19
 
  Most men pursue the pleasures, as they call them, of their natures, which begin in sin, are carried on with danger, and end in bitterness.
William Wake.    
  20
 
  Did we perfectly know the state of our own condition, and what was most proper for us, we might have reason to conclude our prayers not heard, if not answered.
William Wake.    
  21
 
  Nothing but a steady resolution brought to practice; God’s grace used; his commandments obeyed, and his pardon begged; nothing but this will entitle you to God’s acceptance.
William Wake.    
  22
 
  I must lay this down for your encouragement, that we are no longer now under the heavy yoke of a perfect unsinning obedience.
William Wake.    
  23
 
  Peevishness, the general fault of sick persons, is equally to be avoided for the folly and sinfulness.
William Wake.    
  24
 
  You must firmly be convinced that every sin you commit sets you at enmity with heaven, and will, if not forsaken, render you incapable of it.
William Wake.    
  25
 
  Ours is a melancholy and uncomfortable portion here below! A place where not a day passes but we eat our bread with sorrow and cares: the present troubles us, the future amazes; and even the past fills us with grief and anguish.
William Wake.    
  26
 
 
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