Reference > Quotations > S. Austin Allibone, comp. > Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay
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S. Austin Allibone, comp.  Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay.  1880.
 
Daniel Waterland
 
  A mediator is considered two ways, by nature or by office, as the fathers distinguish. He is a mediator by nature, as partaking of both natures, divine and human; and mediator by office, as transacting matters between God and man.
Daniel Waterland.    
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  It [example] comes in by the eyes and ears, and slips insensibly into the heart, and so into the outward practice, by a kind of secret charm transforming men’s minds and manners into his own likeness.
Daniel Waterland.    
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  It.is a proper business of a divine to state cases of conscience, and to remonstrate against any growing corruptions in practice, and especially in principles.
Daniel Waterland.    
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  The more sincere you are, the better it will fare with you at the great day of account. In the mean while, give us leave to be sincere too in condemning heartily what we heartily disapprove.
Daniel Waterland.    
  4
 
  The use of language and custom of speech in all authors I have met with has gone upon this rule or maxim: that exclusive terms are always to be understood in opposition only to what they are opposed to, and not in opposition to what they are not opposed to.
Daniel Waterland.    
  5
 
 
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