Verse > Henry Wadsworth Longfellow > Complete Poetical Works
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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–1882).  Complete Poetical Works.  1893.
 
Appendix
II. Unacknowledged and Uncollected Translations.
Sicilian Canzonet
 
WHAT shall I do, sweet Nici, tell me,
I burn,—I burn—I can no more!
I know not how the thing befell me,
But I ’m in love, and all is o’er.
One look,—alas! one glance of thine,        5
One single glance my death shall be;
Even this poor heart no more is mine,
For, Nici, it belongs to thee.
 
How shall I then my grief repress,
How shall this soul in anguish live?        10
I fear a no,—desire a yes,
But which the answer thou wilt give?
No,—Love,—not so deceived am I;
Soft pity dwells in those bright eyes,
And no tyrannic cruelty        15
Within that gentle bosom lies.
 
Then, fairest Nici, speak and say
If I must know thy love or hate;
Oh, do not leave me thus, I pray,
But speak,—be quick,—I cannot wait.        20
Quick,—I entreat thee;—if not so,
This weary soul no more shall sigh;—
So tell me quickly,—yes or no,
Which,—which shall be my destiny.
 
 
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