Verse > Anthologies > Elizabethan Sonnets > Cœlia
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Seccombe and Arber, comps.  Elizabethan Sonnets.  1904.
 
Cœlia
Sonnet VI. Good God! how senseless be we paramours
William Percy (1575–1648)
 
GOOD God! how senseless be we paramours,
So proudly on a Nothing for to vaunt it!
We cannot reap the meanest of all favours,
But, by-and-by, we think our suit is grantit!
  Had ye observed two Planets which then mounted,        5
Two certain signs of indignation;
Ye would have deemed rather both consented
To turn all hopes to desperation.
  Then can you waver so inconstantly
To shew first Love, and then Disdainfulness?        10
First for to bring a dram of courtesy,
Then mix it with an ounce of scornfulness?
  No, no, the doubt is answered! Certainly,
  She trod by chance; She trod not wittingly!
 
 
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