Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. II. Love
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Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume II. Love.  1904.
 
II. Love’s Nature
Love’s Silence
Sir Philip Sidney (1554–1586)
 
BECAUSE I breathe not love to everie one,
  Nor do not use set colors for to weare,
  Nor nourish special locks of vowèd haire,
Nor give each speech a full point of a groane,—
The courtlie nymphs, acquainted with the moane        5
  Of them who on their lips Love’s standard beare,
  “What! he?” say they of me. “Now I dare sweare
He cannot love: No, no! let him alone.”
  And think so still,—if Stella know my minde.
Profess, indeed, I do not Cupid’s art;        10
  But you, faire maids, at length this true shall finde,—
That his right badge is but worne in the hearte.
  Dumb swans, not chattering pies, do lovers prove:
  They love indeed who quake to say they love.
 
 
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