Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. V. Nature
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Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume V. Nature.  1904.
 
II. Light: Day: Night
Morning
James Beattie (1735–1803)
 
From “The Minstrel”

  BUT who the melodies of morn can tell?
  The wild brook babbling down the mountainside;
  The lowing herd; the sheepfold’s simple bell;
  The pipe of early shepherd dim descried
  In the lone valley; echoing far and wide        5
  The clamorous horn along the cliffs above;
  The hollow murmur of the ocean-tide;
  The hum of bees, the linnet’s lay of love,
And the full choir that wakes the universal grove.
 
  The cottage curs at early pilgrim bark;        10
  Crowned with her pail the tripping milkmaid sings;
  The whistling ploughman stalks afield; and, hark!
  Down the rough slope the ponderous wagon rings;
  Through rustling corn the hare astonished springs;
  Slow tolls the village-clock the drowsy hour;        15
  The partridge bursts away, on whirring wings;
  Deep mourns the turtle in sequestered bower,
And shrill lark carols clear from her aerial tower.
 
 
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