Verse > Anthologies > The World’s Best Poetry > Vol. VII. Descriptive: Narrative
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Bliss Carman, et al., eds.  The World’s Best Poetry.
Volume VII. Descriptive: Narrative.  1904.
 
Descriptive Poems: I. Personal: Great Writers
Macaulay as Poet
Walter Savage Landor (1775–1864)
 
THE DREAMY rhymer’s measured snore
Falls heavy on our ears no more;
And by long strides are left behind
The dear delights of womankind,
Who wage their battles like their loves,        5
In satin waistcoats and kid gloves,
And have achieved the crowning work
When they have trussed and skewered a Turk.
Another comes with stouter tread,
And stalks among the statelier dead.        10
He rushes on, and hails by turns
High-crested Scott, broad-breasted Burns;
And shows the British youth, who ne’er
Will lag behind, what Romans were,
When all the Tuscans and their Lars        15
Shouted, and shook the towers of Mars.
 
 
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