Nonfiction > Lionel Strachey, et al., eds. > The World’s Wit and Humor > British
The World’s Wit and Humor: An Encyclopedia in 15 Volumes.  1906.
Vols. VI–IX: British
The Education of Women
By Daniel Defoe (1661?–1731)
From “An Essay upon Projects”

A WOMAN well-bred and well-taught, furnished with the additional accomplishments of knowledge and behaviour, is a creature without comparison; her society is the emblem of sublimer enjoyments; her person is angelic and her conversation heavenly; she is all softness and sweetness, peace, love, wit, and delight; she is every way suitable to the sublimest wish, and the man that has such a one to his portion has nothing to do but to rejoice in her and be thankful.
  On the other hand, suppose her to be the very same woman, and rob her of the benefit of education, and it follows thus:  2
  If her temper be good, want of education makes her soft and easy.  3
  Her wit, for want of teaching, makes her impertinent and talkative.  4
  Her knowledge, for want of judgment and experience, makes her fanciful and whimsical.  5
  If her temper be bad, want of breeding makes her worse, and she grows haughty, insolent, and loud.  6
  If she be passionate, want of manners makes her termagant and a scold, which is much at one with lunatic.  7
  If she be proud, want of discretion (which still is breeding) makes her conceited, fantastic, and ridiculous.  8
  And from these she degenerates to be turbulent, clamorous, noisy, nasty, and “the devil.”  9

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