Nonfiction > Lionel Strachey, et al., eds. > The World’s Wit and Humor > French
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The World’s Wit and Humor: An Encyclopedia in 15 Volumes.  1906.
Vols. X–XI: French
 
Reflections
By Marquis de Vauvenargues (1715–1747)
 

WHEN a thought is too feeble to bear simple expression, it is better left unuttered.
  1
  There are few constant passions, though many sincere ones. Formerly men affected a false constancy, to-day they affect a false indifference. ’Tis all according to the fashion.  2
  If you feel that it is some fault in yourself that prevents you from gaining the esteem of a certain person, then you are sure to hate him.  3
  Certain fools, sitting together at table said, “We alone are good company.” And they believed each other.  4
  We are less hurt by the contempt of fools than by the coldness of wise men.  5
  Why believe that poverty improves a man’s morals?  6
  A great man undertakes a great thing because it is great; a fool because he considers it easy.  7
  Rogues are always surprised at honesty in others.  8
 
 
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