Nonfiction > Lionel Strachey, et al., eds. > The World’s Wit and Humor > Greek, Roman & Oriental
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The World’s Wit and Humor: An Encyclopedia in 15 Volumes.  1906.
Vol. XV: Greek—Roman—Oriental
 
The Dog and His Shadow
By Æsop (c. 620–560 B.C.) (attributed)
 
From “Fables

AS a dog, crossing a bridge, was carrying a piece of meat in his mouth, he saw his own shadow in the watery mirror; and, thinking that it was another booty carried by another dog, attempted to snatch it away. But his greediness was disappointed, for he both dropped the food which he was holding in his mouth, and was after all unable to obtain that which he desired.
  1
  He who covets what belongs to another, deservedly loses his own.  2
 
 
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