Nonfiction > E.C. Stedman & E.M. Hutchinson, eds. > A Library of American Literature > 1861–1889
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Stedman and Hutchinson, comps.  A Library of American Literature:
An Anthology in Eleven Volumes.  1891.
Vols. IX–XI: Literature of the Republic, Part IV., 1861–1889
 
Stanzas from “Fryeburg”
By Henry Bernard Carpenter (1840–1890)
 
[Poem at Fryeburg, Me., 1882.]

KEARSARGE.

TWO crowns of glory clasp thy calm, chaste brow.
  O ye strong hills, bear witness to my verse,
  Thou “Maledetto,” mountain of the curse,
Chocorua, blasted by thy chief, and thou,
  Kearsarge, slope-shouldered monarch of this vale,        5
  Who gavest thy conquering name to that swift sail
Which caught in Gallic seas the rebel bark,
  And downward drove the Alabama’s pride
  To deep sea-sleep in Cherbourg’s ravening tide,
What time faint Commerce watched a nation’s ark        10
  Sinking with shattered side.
 
WEBSTER.

’TWAS Magna Charta’s morning in July,
  When, in that temple reared of old to Truth,
  He rose, in the bronze bloom of blood-bright youth,
To speak what he respake when death was nigh.        15
  Strongly he stood, Olympian-framed, with front
  Like some carved crag where sleeps the lightning’s brunt,
Black, thunderous brows, and thunderous deep-toned speech
  Like Pericles, of whom the people said
  That when he spake it thundered; round him spread        20
The calm of summer nights when the stars teach
  In silence overhead.
 
 
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