Nonfiction > E.C. Stedman & E.M. Hutchinson, eds. > A Library of American Literature > 1861–1889
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Stedman and Hutchinson, comps.  A Library of American Literature:
An Anthology in Eleven Volumes.  1891.
Vols. IX–XI: Literature of the Republic, Part IV., 1861–1889
 
Cavalry Song
By Rossiter Worthington Raymond (1840–1918)
 
[Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1840. Died in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1918.]

OUR bugles sound gayly. To horse and away!
And over the mountains breaks the day;
Then ho! brothers, ho! for the ride or the fight,
There are deeds to be done ere we slumber to-night!
  And whether we fight or whether we fall        5
  By sabre-stroke or rifle-ball,
  The hearts of the free will remember us yet,
  And our country, our country will never forget!
 
Then mount and away! let the coward delight
To be lazy all day and safe all night;        10
Our joy is a charger, flecked with foam,
And the earth is our bed and the saddle our home;
  And whether we fight, etc.
 
See yonder the ranks of the traitorous foe,
And bright in the sunshine bayonets glow!
Breathe a prayer, but no sigh; think for what you would fight;        15
Then charge! with a will, boys, and God for the right!
  And whether we fight, etc.
 
We have gathered again the red laurels of war;
We have followed the traitors fast and far;
But some who rose gayly this morn with the sun
Lie bleeding and pale on the field they have won!        20
  But whether we fight or whether we fall
  By sabre-stroke or rifle-ball,
  The hearts of the free will remember us yet,
  And our country, our country will never forget!
 
 
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