Nonfiction > Theodore Roosevelt > Theodore Roosevelt’s Letters to His Children
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Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919).  Theodore Roosevelt’s Letters to His Children.  1919.

66. SKIP IN THE WHITE HOUSE
 
White House, May 14, 1905.    

DEAR KERMIT:
  That was a good mark in Latin, and I am pleased with your steady improvement in it.
   1
  Skip is housebroken, but he is like a real little Indian. He can stand any amount of hard work if there is a bear or bobcat ahead, but now that he is in the White House he thinks he would much rather do nothing but sit about all day with his friends, and threatens to turn into a lapdog. But when we get him to Oyster Bay I think we can make him go out riding with us, and then I think he will be with Archie a great deal. He and Jack are rather jealous of one another. He is very cunning and friendly. I am immensely pleased with Mother's Virginia cottage and its name. I am going down there for Sunday with her some time soon.   2
  P. S.—Your marks have just come! By George, you have worked hard and I am delighted. Three cheers!   3
 
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