Reference > Quotations > Grocott & Ward, comps. > Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.
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Grocott & Ward, comps.  Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.  189-?.
 
Blot
 
Poets lose half the praise they should have got,
Could it be known what they discreetly blot.
        Waller.—On Roscommon’s Translation, De Arte Poetica.
  1
Ev’n copious Dryden wanted, or forgot,
The last and greatest art, the art to blot.
        Pope.—To Augustus, Epistle I. Line 280.
  2
Not one immoral, one corrupted thought,
One line which, dying, he could wish to blot.
        Lyttleton.—Prologue to Thomson’s Coriolanus, Line 23.
  3
        No song
Of mine, from youth to age, has left a stain
I would blot out.
        Bowles.—Barnwell Hill, Part V. Line 218.
  4
It is a consolation that from youth to age, I have found no line I wished to blot, or departed a moment from the severer taste which I imbibed from the simplest and purest models of classical composition.
        Bowles.—Advertisement to St. John in Patmos.
  5
I will excuse your blots upon paper, because they are the only blots that you ever did or ever will make.
        Swift.—To Queensbury, 20th March, 1733.
  6
 
 
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