Reference > Quotations > Grocott & Ward, comps. > Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.
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Grocott & Ward, comps.  Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.  189-?.
 
Bells
 
Your voices break and falter in the darkness,—
Break, falter, and are still.
        Bret Harte.—The Angelus, Last Stanza.
  1
Can the tolling of the Old South bell be painted?
        Hawthorne.—American Note-Books. Salem, September 14, 1841.
  2
When o’er the street the morning peal is flung
From yon tall belfry with the brazen tongue,
Its wide vibrations, wafted by the gale,
To each far listener tell a different tale.
        Holmes.—The Bells.
  3
Those dumb mouths that have no speech,
Only a cry from each to each,
  In its own kind, with its own laws;
Something that is beyond the reach
Of human power to learn or teach,—
An inarticulate moan of pain,
Like the immeasurable main
Breaking upon an unknown beach.
        Longfellow.—Tales of a Wayside Inn: The Bell of Atri, Interlude, Line 2.
  4
 
 
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