Reference > Quotations > Grocott & Ward, comps. > Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.
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Grocott & Ward, comps.  Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.  189-?.
 
Fame
 
Above all Greek, above all Roman fame.
        Pope.—To Augustus, Book II. Epi. I. Line 26.
  1
Above any Greek or Roman name.
        Dryden.—On Lord Hastings.
  2
What rage for fame attends both great and small!
Better be d—d than be not nam’d at all!
        Wolcot.—Ode IX. Ver. 2. A.D. 1784.
  3
Fame is swiftest still when she goes laden
With news of mischief.—
Thus are we Fortune’s pastimes; one day live
Advanc’d to heaven by the people’s breath;
The next, hurl’d down into th’ abyss of death.
        May.—The Old Couple, Act V.
  4
He lives in fame that died in virtue’s cause.
        Shakespeare.—Titus Andronicus, Act I. Scene 2. (Lucius.)
  5
Death, courage, honour, makes thy soul to live,
Thy soul to live in heaven, thy name in tongues of men.
        Henry Constable.—Sonnet to Sir Philip Sidney’s soul.
  6
Nor fame I slight, nor for her favours call:
She comes unlook’d for, if she comes at all.
        Pope.—Temple of Fame, Line 513.
  7
        There is who feels for fame,
And melts to goodness.
        Pope.—Epilogue to Satires, Line 65, Dialogue II.
  8
  [A fine compliment; the expression shewing that fame was but his second passion.—Gilfillan, Editor of the British Poets.]  9
And yet, after all, what is posthumous fame? Altogether vanity.
        Antoninus.—Riley’s Class. Dict. 552.
  10
What is the end of fame? ’Tis but to fill
A certain portion of uncertain paper.
        Byron.—Don Juan, Canto I. Stanza 218.
  11
 
 
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