Reference > Quotations > Grocott & Ward, comps. > Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.
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Grocott & Ward, comps.  Grocott’s Familiar Quotations, 6th ed.  189-?.
 
Feet
 
How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth glad tidings.
        Isaiah, Chap. lii. Ver. 7.
  1
Whose feet they hurt in the stocks: the iron entered into his soul.
        Psalm cv. Ver. 18.
  2
I heard his chains upon his legs as he turned his body to lay his little stick upon the bundle. He gave a deep sigh; I saw the iron enter into his soul.
        Sterne.—Sent. Journey: The Captive.
  3
Who of you, then, would announce to those within the wished-for presence of our common feet.
        Sophocles.—Trans. by Buckley. (Electra.)
  4
O thou that hast the most welcome service of the feet.
        Sophocles.—Trans. by Buckley.
  5
Her feet, beneath her petticoat,
Like little mice, stole in and out,
    As if they fear’d the light;
But oh! she dances such a way,
No sun upon an Easter-day
    Is half so fine a sight.
        Sir John Suckling.—A Ballad upon a Wedding. Verse 8.
  6
And the prettiest foot; Oh if a man could but fasten his eyes to her feet as they steal in and out, and play at bo-peep under her petticoats, Ah! Mr. Trapland?
        Congreve.—Love for Love, Act I. Scene 5. Valentine to Trapland. (Suckling died before Congreve was born.)
  7
Her pretty feet like snails do creep
  A little out, and then,
As if they played at bo-peep,
  Did soon draw in again.
        Herrick.—The Hesperides, Amatory Odes, No. 207.
  8
 
 
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