Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
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Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Motive
 
  Iago’s soliloquy—the motive-hunting of a motiveless malignity—how awful it is!
        Coleridge—Shakespeare. Notes on Othello.
  1
What makes life dreary is the want of motive.
        George Eliot—Daniel Deronda. Bk. VIII. Ch. LXV.
  2
A good intention clothes itself with sudden power.
        Emerson—Essays. Fate.
  3
For there’s nothing we read of in torture’s inventions,
Like a well-meaning dunce, with the best of intentions.
        Lowell—A Fable for Critics. L. 250.
  4
  Men’s minds are as variant as their faces. Where the motives of their actions are pure, the operation of the former is no more to be imputed to them as a crime, than the appearance of the latter; for both, being the work of nature, are alike unavoidable.
        George Washington—Social Maxims. Difference of Opinion no Crime.
  5
 
 
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