Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
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Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Mouse
 
I holde a mouses herte nat worth a leek.
That hath but oon hole for to sterte to.
        Chaucer—Paraphrase of the Prologue of The Wyves Tale of Bath. L. 572.
  1
  The mouse that hath but one hole is quickly taken.
        Herbert—Jacula Prudentum. Plautus—Trunculentus. IV.
  2
                It had need to bee
A wylie mouse that should breed in the cat’s eare.
        Heywood—Proverbs. Pt. II. Ch. V.
  3
“Once on a time there was a mouse,” quoth she,
  “Who sick of worldly tears and laughter, grew
Enamoured of a sainted privacy;
  To all terrestrial things he bade adieu,
And entered, far from mouse, or cat, or man,
A thick-walled cheese, the best of Parmesan.”
        Lorenzo Pignotti—The Mouse Turned Hermit.
  4
  When a building is about to fall down all the mice desert it.
        Pliny the Elder—Natural History. Bk. VIII. Sec. CIII.
  5
The mouse that always trusts to one poor hole,
Can never be a mouse of any soul.
        Pope—The Wife of Bath. Her Prologue. L. 298.
  6
The mouse ne’er shunn’d the cat as they did budge
From rascals worse than they.
        Coriolanus. Act I. Sc. 6. L. 44.
  7
 
 
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