Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
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Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Peacock
 
For everything seemed resting on his nod,
  As they could read in all eyes. Now to them,
Who were accustomed, as a sort of god,
  To see the sultan, rich in many a gem,
Like an imperial peacock stalk abroad
  (That royal bird, whose tail’s a diadem,)
With all the pomp of power, it was a doubt
How power could condescend to do without.
        Byron—Don Juan. Canto VII. St. 74.
  1
To frame the little animal, provide
All the gay hues that wait on female pride:
Let Nature guide thee; sometimes golden wire
The shining bellies of the fly require;
The peacock’s plumes thy tackle must not fail,
Nor the dear purchase of the sable’s tail.
        Gay—Rural Sports. Canto I. L. 177.
  2
To Paradise, the Arabs say,
Satan could never find the way
  Until the peacock led him in.
        Leland—The Peacock.
  3
“Fly pride,” says the peacock.
        Comedy of Errors. Act IV. Sc. 3. L. 81.
  4
Let frantic Talbot triumph for a while
And like a peacock sweep along his tail.
        Henry VI. Pt. I. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 5.
  5
  Why, he stalks up and down like a peacock,—a stride and a stand.
        Troilus and Cressida. Act III. Sc. 3. L. 251.
  6
And there they placed a peacock in his pride,
Before the damsel.
        Tennyson—Gareth and Lynette.
  7
 
 
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