Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
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Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Tea
 
Matrons, who toss the cup, and see
The grounds of fate in grounds of tea.
        Churchill—The Ghost. Bk. I. L. 117.
  1
  Tea! thou soft, thou sober, sage, and venerable liquid,  *  *  *  thou female tongue-running, smile-smoothing, heart-opening, wink-tippling cordial, to whose glorious insipidity I owe the happiest moment of my life, let me fall prostrate.
        Colley Cibber—Lady’s Last Stake. Act I. Sc. 1.
  2
Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast,
Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round,
And while the bubbling and loud-hissing urn
Throws up a steamy column, and the cups,
That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each,
So let us welcome peaceful evening in.
        Cowper—Task. Bk. IV. L. 36.
  3
Here, thou, great Anna! whom three realms obey,
Dost sometimes counsel take—and sometimes tea.
        Pope—Rape of the Lock. Canto III. L. 7.
  4
  Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? how did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea.
        Sydney Smith—Lady Holland’s Memoir. Vol. I. P. 383.
  5
            Tea does our fancy aid,
Repress those vapours which the head invade
And keeps that palace of the soul serene.
        Edmund Waller—Of Tea.
  6
 
 
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