Reference > Quotations > Hoyt & Roberts, comps. > Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations
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Hoyt & Roberts, comps.  Hoyt’s New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations.  1922.
 
Woe
 
An Iliad of woes.
        Demosthenes. 387. 12. Diodorus Siculus. De Quincey—Confessions of an Opium Eater. Pt. II.
  1
Waste brings woe, and sorrow hates despair.
        Robert Greene—Sonnet.
  2
When one is past, another care we have;
Thus woe succeeds a woe, as wave a wave.
        Herrick—Sorrows Succeed.
  3
And woe succeeds to woe.
        Homer—Iliad. Bk. XVI. L. 139. Pope’s trans.
  4
Long exercised in woes.
        Homer—Odyssey. Bk. I. L. 2. Pope’s trans.
  5
  Woe unto you,… for ye pay tithe of mint and anise and cummin.
        Matthew. XXIII. 23.
  6
So perish all whose breast ne’er learned to glow
For other’s good or melt at other’s woe.
        Pope—Elegy to an Unfortunate Lady. Homer—Odyssey. Bk. XVIII. 269.
  7
I was not always a man of woe.
        Scott—Lay of the Last Minstrel. Canto II. St. 12.
  8
One woe doth tread upon another’s heel
So fast they follow.
        Hamlet. Act IV. Sc. 7. L. 165.
  9
        All these woes shall serve
For sweet discourses in our time to come.
        Romeo and Juliet. Act III. Sc. 5. L. 52.
  10
Woes, cluster; rare are solitary woes;
They love a train, they tread each other’s heel.
        Young—Night Thoughts. Night III. L. 63.
  11
 
 
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