Reference > Brewer’s Dictionary > Sheep.

 Shebeen.Sheet Anchor. 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.
 
Sheep.
 
Ram or tup, the sire; ewe, the dam; lamb, the new-born sheep till it is weaned, when it is called a hogget; the tup-lamb being a “tup-hogget,” and the ewe-lamb a “ewe-hogget;” if the tup is castrated it is called a wether-hogget.   1
   After the removal of the first fleece, the tup-hogget becomes a shearling, the ewe-hogget a grimmer, and the wether-hogget a dinmont (hence the name “Dandy Dinmont”).   2
   After the removal of the second fleece, the shearling becomes a two-shear tup, the grimmer a ewe, and the dinmont a wether.   3
   After the removal of the third fleece, the ewe is called a twinter-ewe; and when it ceases to breed, a draft-ewe.   4
   The Black Sheep (Kârâ-koin-loo). A tribe which established a principality in Armenia, that lasted 108 years (1360–1468); so called from the device of their standard.   5
   The White Sheep (Ak-koin-loo). A tribe which established a principality in Armenia, etc., on the ruin of the Black Sheep (1468–1508); so called from the device of their standard.   6
   To cast a sheep’s eye at one is to look askance, like a sheep, at a person to whom you feel lovingly inclined.   7
        “But he, the beast, was casting sheep’s eyes at her.”—Colman: Broad Grins.
 


 Shebeen.Sheet Anchor. 

 
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