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Robert Christy, comp.  Proverbs, Maxims and Phrases of All Ages.  1887.
 
Tree
 
A good walnut tree is as good to a poor man as a milch cow.  Italian.  1
A great tree hath a great fall.  2
A short tree stands long.  3
A tree is known by its fruit.  4
A tree often transplanted neither grows nor thrives.  Spanish.  5
A twig in time becomes a tree.  Latin.  6
Airly crooks the tree that good cammock should be.  7
All leaf and no fruit.  Spanish.  8
All superfluous branches we lop away that bearing boughs may live.  Shakespeare.  9
As the tree so the fruit.  German.  10
As the twig is bent the tree’s inclined.  11
Delicious fruit is pleasing to the taste, but it is the tree that bears it that merits our esteem.  Arabian.  12
Good fruit never comes from a bad tree.  Portuguese.  13
Great trees are uprooted in an hour.  14
Great trees give more shade than fruit.  German.  15
Great trees keep down the little ones.  16
He that plants trees loves others beside himself.  17
He who leaneth against a good tree, a good shelter findeth he.  Don Quixote.  18
He who plants fruit trees must not count upon the fruit.  Dutch.  19
High trees give more shadow than fruit.  Dutch.  20
It is only at the tree loaded with fruit that people throw stones.  French.  21
Judge of the tree by its fruit.  22
Many desire the tree who pretend to refuse the fruit.  Italian.  23
No tree falls at the first stroke.  German.  24
Nobody lets go a tree and springs in the air.  Accra (Africa).  25
Of a good tree the fruit is also good.  Modern Greek.  26
Old trees are not to be bent.  German.  27
Set trees poor and they will grow rich.
Set them rich and they will grow poor.
  28
Shake the tree when fruit is ripe.  29
Soon crooks the tree that good gambrel would be.  30
Straight trees have crooked roots.  31
Such as the tree is, such is the fruit.  32
Tall trees catch much wind.  Dutch.  33
The best trees are the most beaten.  Italian.  34
The highest tree hath the greatest fall.  35
The more the good tree grows the more shade does it afford. (The good rich man’s munificence increases with his age.)  Modern Greek.  36
The more noble the tree the more pliant the twig.  Dutch.  37
The old withy tree would have a new gate hung to it.  38
The tree does not fall at the first stroke.  French, Italian, Dutch.  39
The tree is known by its fruit.  New Testament.  40
The tree is no sooner down than every one runs for his hatchet.  41
The tree is not to be judged by its bark.  Italian.  42
The tree is sure to be pruned before it reaches the skies.  Danish.  43
The tree must be bent while it is young.  German.  44
There is no tree but bears some fruit.  45
Though a tree grow ever so high, its falling leaves return to the root.  Chinese.  46
To the fallen tree, hatchets! hatchets!  Italian.  47
When the tree falls every one runs to cut boughs.  Dutch, Danish.  48
When the tree falls the shade is gone, i.e., the unfortunate man is deserted.  Chinese.  49
When the tree is down everybody gathers wood.  Latin.  50
 
 
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