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1) Cl. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Cl, symbol for the element chlorine....

2) common-ion effect. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The common-ion effect is an example of chemical equilibrium. For example, silver chloride, AgCl, is a slightly soluble salt that in solution dissociates into the...

3) chlorine. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Chlorine is a greenish-yellow poisonous gas with a disagreeable, suffocating odor; it is about two and one-half times as dense as air. Only fluorine among the nonmetals...

4) halogen. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Astatine (At), formerly known as alabamine, is a radioactive element also classed as a halogen; its most stable isotope (which does not occur in nature) has a half-life...

5) chlorofluorocarbons. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The most common commercial CFCs, marketed under the trade name Freon, are trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12). Commercial CFCs are...

6) electronegativity. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...For example, the molecule hydrogen chloride, HCl, consists of a hydrogen atom, H, and a chlorine atom, Cl, sharing a pair of electrons. If the pair of electrons are...

7) anion. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The charge results because there are more electrons than protons in the anion. Anions can be formed from nonmetals by reduction (see oxidation and reduction) or from...

8) Beer's law. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Lambert law or the Bouguer-Beer law. Beer's law is commonly written in the form A=cl, where A is the absorbance, c is the concentration in moles per liter, l is the...

9) ammonium group. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...ammonium group, in chemistry, a positively charged nitrogen atom joined by single bonds to four other atoms or groups. The simplest ammonium group, NH4+, is formed...

10) dissociation. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Thermal dissociation occurs at high temperatures. For example, hydrogen molecules (H2) dissociate into atoms (H) at very high temperatures; at 5,000K about 95% of...

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