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Search Results for “Fat and oil (food)”
 
 
1) margarine. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...French chemist Hippolyte Mege-Mouries in a contest sponsored by Napoleon III for a butter substitute. Beef fat, known as oleo oil, was chiefly used at first, but...

2) olive oil. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Olive oil was used in the ancient world for lighting, in the preparation of food, and as an anointing oil for both ritual and cosmetic purposes. It is produced mainly...

3) souari. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The fatty "nuts," botanically drupe fruits, somewhat resemble Brazil nuts but are much larger and richer in taste. The flesh surrounding the seeds is sometimes cooked...

4) hydrogenation. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Hydrogen is added (in the presence of a nickel catalyst) to carbon-carbon double bonds in the unsaturated fatty acid portion of the fat or oil molecule:Another hydrogenation...

5) fats and oils. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The fats are usually solid, the oils generally liquid at ordinary room temperatures. Some tropical products, liquids in their sites of origin, become solids in cooler...

6) cooking. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Many common cooking methods involve the use of oil. Frying is cooking in hot oil; sauteing is cooking in a small amount of oil; stir-frying is a Chinese technique...

7) porpoise. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...They are distinguished from dolphins by their smaller size and their rounded, beakless heads. Porpoises are 4 to 6 ft (120-180 cm) long and are black above and white...

8) hickory, in botany. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Carya of the family Juglandaceae (walnut family); deciduous nut-bearing trees native to E North America and south to Central America except for a few species found...

9) palm. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Most species are treelike, characterized by a crown of compound leaves, called fronds, terminating a tall, woody, unbranched stem. The fruits, covered with a tough...

10) lard. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The highest grade, leaf lard, is from the fat around the kidneys; the next best is from the back, and the poorest from the small intestines. Lard is classed by method...

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