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Search Results for “Horsepower”
 
 
1) horsepower. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...English system of units. It is equal to 33,000 foot-pounds per minute or 550 foot-pounds per second or approximately 746 watts. The term horsepower originated with...

2) power, in physics. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The unit of power based on the English units of measurement is the horsepower, devised for describing mechanical power by James Watt, who estimated that a horse can...

3) tugboat. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Tugboats range in overall length from 70 to 210 ft (21-64 m), and their engines generate from 750 to 3,000 horsepower. Steam power dominated tugboat design until...

4) marine engine. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The earliest marine power plants, reciprocating steam engines, were used almost exclusively until the early 1900s. In later ship construction these were largely replaced...

5) snowmobile. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Since the two-cycle internal-combustion engine and the Wankel engine are lighter for a given horsepower than a four-cycle engine, they are preferred for powering...

6) Watt, James. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...While working at the Univ. of Glasgow as an instrument maker, Watt was asked to repair a model of Thomas Newcomen's steam engine. He devised improvements that resulted...

7) Chavez, Carlos. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Mexican composer and conductor. In 1928, Chavez established the Symphony Orchestra of Mexico, which he conducted until 1949. He was also director (1928-34) of the...

8) internal-combustion engine. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Such engines are classified as reciprocating or rotary, spark ignition or compression ignition, and two-stroke or four-stroke; the most familiar combination, used...

9) seaplane. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The two most common types are the floatplane, whose fuselage is supported by struts attached to two or more pontoon floats, and the flying boat, whose boat-hull fuselage...

10) airplane. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Parts of an AirplaneThe airplane has six main parts-fuselage, wings, stabilizer (or tail plane), rudder, one or more engines, and landing gear. The fuselage is the...

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