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Search Results for “Nitrates (pharmacology)”
 
 
1) nitrate. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Nitrates are salts or esters of nitric acid, HNO3, formed by replacing the hydrogen with a metal (e.g., sodium or potassium) or a radical (e.g., ammonium or ethyl)....

2) Antofagasta. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Antofagasta region, N Chile, a port on the Pacific Ocean. Antofagasta was founded by Chileans in 1870 to exploit nitrates in the Atacama Desert, then under Bolivian...

3) nitrogen cycle. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Nitrogen is vital to all living matter, both plant and animal; it is an essential constituent of amino acids, which form proteins of nucleic acids, and of many other...

4) Iquique. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The city, founded in the 16th cent., was taken (1879) from Peru by Chile during the War of the Pacific (see Pacific, War of the). Since rain rarely falls, water must...

5) Jimma. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Oromia region, SW Ethiopia. It is the commercial center for a coffee-producing region. Potassium and sodium nitrates are mined NE of the city. An agricultural school...

6) autotroph. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Autotrophs produce their own sugars, lipids, and amino acids using carbon dioxide as a source of carbon, and ammonia or nitrates as a source of nitrogen. Organisms...

7) water pollution. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Industrial PollutionIn the United States industry is the greatest source of pollution, accounting for more than half the volume of all water pollution and for the...

8) cyanosis. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Cyanosis that is caused by slowed circulation through peripheral blood vessels results in a bluish tinge only on the cool portions of the body (fingertips, nose,...

9) cellulose. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Cellulose has been used for the manufacture of paper since the 2d cent. Insoluble in water and other ordinary solvents, it exhibits marked properties of absorption....

10) hydrazine. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Hydrazine is corrosive and a strong reducing agent, but it is a weaker base than ammonia. It reacts with water to form hydrazine hydrate, N2H4ĚH2O, a colorless liquid...

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