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Search Results for “Ornament (music)”
 
 
1) ornament, in architecture. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Structural ornament, an integral part of the framework, includes the shaping and placement of the buttress, cornice, molding, ceiling, and roof and the capital and...

2) stalactite ornament. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Generally executed in wood or in plaster over a wood or brick base, it consists of little vertical polygonal or curved niches rising and projecting in rows above...

3) ornament, in music. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Ornamentation was practiced as early as the Middle Ages by the singers of plainsong, and the practice seems to have reached its height in the baroque era. Treatises...

4) modern architecture. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Western countries in the decade after World War I. It was based on the "rational" use of modern materials, the principles of functionalist planning, and the rejection...

5) trill. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Indicated by any of several conventional symbols, it varies in speed and duration and in the manner of its beginning and ending according to context. Originating...

6) crown. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...For crowns worn by nobles, see coronet.) The use of the crown as a symbol of royal rank is of ancient tradition in Egypt and the Middle East. In ancient Greece and...

7) button. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Although buttons were sometimes used as fasteners by Greeks and Romans, they were more often merely ornamental disks. They first became widely used when fitted garments...

8) crest. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The term is incorrectly used to mean family coat of arms. Crests were widely used in the 13th cent. by feudal chiefs, as they had been by ancient Greek warriors and...

9) festoon. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...When a festoon hangs down from only one end, it is called a drop, but when it hangs from both ends it is termed a swag. The festoon reproduces the actual garland...

10) jewelry. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The most universal forms of jewelry are the necklace, bracelet, ring, pin, and earring. Its use antedates clothing, and it has been made of a variety of materials...

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