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Search Results for “Rope”
 
 
1) rope. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...rope, see cordage....

2) pulley. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Thus arranged, the device is called a block and tackle. The number of pulley wheels mounted in the fixed and free blocks can be increased indefinitely to get a higher...

3) cordage. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Early man used strips of hide, animal hair, and plant materials. Hemp and flax were formerly standard in Europe and America but were largely replaced in the 19th...

4) lasso. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Horsehair or rawhide lassos were formerly common in America, but they have almost completely given way to the hemp and nylon ropes, which are far more efficient roping...

5) Kanuma. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Tochigi prefecture, central Honshu, Japan. It is an industrial center where brooms, hemp yarn and rope, lumber, and furniture are produced....

6) San Miguel. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...San Miguel volcano (6,996 ft/2,132 m). It has textile, rope, and dairy-products industries. The region produces cotton, henequen, and vegetable oil. San Miguel was...

7) Shelby, Joseph Orville. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Joseph Orville, 1830-97, Confederate cavalry commander in the American Civil War, b. Lexington, Ky. He made a considerable fortune in rope manufacturing in Kentucky...

8) Xenia. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Rope and twine, plastics, potato chips, valves, and hydraulic lifts are among its manufactures. The county historical museum is there. A tornado destroyed about half...

9) raft. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...From prehistoric times to the 19th cent. rafting was an important means of transportation. Rafts were indispensable in the frontier period of American history; on...

10) baobab. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...India and Africa, exceeded in trunk diameter only by the sequoia. The trunks of living baobabs are hollowed out for dwellings; rope and cloth are made from the bark...

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