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Search Results for “Sèvres ware”
 
 
1) Ware, Henry. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...American clergyman, instrumental in the founding of Unitarianism in the United States, b. Sherborn, Mass., grad. Harvard, 1785. As pastor (1787-1805) of the First...

2) Ware, Isaac. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...English architect of the Georgian period. After travels in Italy he was employed in 1729 as clerk of the works at Windsor Castle. For Philip, earl of Chesterfield,...

3) Derby ware. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...English china produced at Derby since about 1750, when William Duesbury opened a pottery there. The china was close in style to contemporary Chelsea ware and Bow...

4) Sevres ware. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...France by the royal (now national) potteries established (1745) by Louis XV at Vincennes, moved (1756) to Sevres after changing hands. Before 1770 it was a soft-paste...

5) Staffordshire ware. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Staffordshire ware, various products of the Potteries district, one of the most famous areas in England for the production of pottery. Late 17th-century slipware...

6) Worcester ware. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Worcester ware, ceramic ware, first manufactured in 1751, when the Lowdin pottery was moved from Bristol to Worcester. Soft paste was employed, and tea services,...

7) Bow ware. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Bow ware, (bo) (KEY) , English porcelain, similar to Chelsea ware. It was made at Stratford-le-Bow from 1730 to 1776, when its factory was absorbed by the Derby ware...

8) Chelsea ware. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Chelsea ware, chinaware made in the mid-18th cent. at a factory in Chelsea, London. The earliest specimens extant are dated 1745 and have the potter's mark of a triangle...

9) Doulton ware. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...English pottery produced at Lambeth after 1815, first by John Doulton and his partners, then by his descendants. It won the medal at the Exhibition of 1851 and more...

10) willow-pattern ware. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Thomas Minton (see Minton, family), then an apprentice potter, developed and engraved the design, presumably after an old Chinese legend. It portrays the garden of...

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