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Search Results for “Typhoid”
 
 
1) typhoid fever. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The main sources of infection are contaminated water or milk and, especially in urban communities, food handlers who are carriers. The symptoms of typhoid appear...

2) salmonellosis. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Typhoid fever, caused by S. typhi, is spread by fecal contamination of water or milk or by food handlers who are carriers. It is characterized by a high fever and...

3) Bretonneau, Pierre. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Bretonneau, Pierre, (pyer brtono´) (KEY) , 1778-1862, French physician. He performed (1825) the first successful tracheotomy for laryngeal diphtheria, wrote a treatise...

4) housefly. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Musca domestica, found in most parts of the world. The housefly, a scavenger, does not bite living animals but is dangerous because it carries bacteria and protozoans...

5) Klebs, Edwin. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Rudolf Virchow and professor of pathology at Zurich (1872-92) and from 1896 at Rush Medical College, Chicago. He is known for his many original observations on the...

6) Wassermann, August von. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...German physician and bacteriologist. In Berlin he was director of the department of experimental therapy and serum research (1906-13) at Koch Institute and director...

7) parasite. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Parasites may or may not harm the host, but they never benefit it. They include members of many plant and animal groups, and nearly all living things are at some...

8) diarrhea. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Diarrhea is a concomitant of many infectious diseases, especially typhoid fever, bacillary or amebic dysentery, and cholera. Persistent diarrhea may result in severe...

9) hemorrhage. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The term is usually applied to a loss of blood that is copious enough to threaten health or life. Slow bleeding may lead to anemia, while the sudden loss of a large...

10) septicemia. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The disorder, which is serious and sometimes fatal, is commonly known as blood poisoning. The invasive organisms are usually streptococci or staphylococci but may...

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