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Search Results for “Veit”
 
 
1) Stoss, Veit. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Krakow (1477-86, 1488-96) and Nuremberg, his birthplace. The great carved wooden high altar in St. Mary's, Krakow, is a significant early work. His stone tomb of...

2) Veit, Philipp. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...German historical painter; grandson of Moses Mendelssohn. In Rome he joined the Nazarenes and was one of the most interesting members of the group. With them he assisted...

3) Schnorr von Carolsfeld, Julius. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...German religious and historical painter and draftsman. He studied with his father, Veit Hans Schnorr von Carolsfeld (1764-1841), a painter and engraver, and in Vienna....

4) Overbeck, Johann Friedrich. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...German religious painter. Expelled from the Vienna Academy because of his opposition to its classicism, he went to Rome and with Peter von Cornelius, Veit, Schadow-Godenhaus,...

5) Schwabach. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Manufactures include wire, needles, chemicals, and processed foods. Schwabach was chartered in the late 14th cent. It passed to Prussia in 1791 and to Bavaria in...

6) Nazarenes. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...German artists of the early 19th cent., who attempted to revive Christian art. In 1809, J. F. Overbeck and Franz Pforr formed an art cooperative in Vienna called...

7) Krakow. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...One of E Europe's largest iron and steel plants is near the city. Founded c.700 and made a bishopric c.1000, Krakow became (1320) the residence of the kings of Poland....

8) Nuremberg. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...Pegnitz River and the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal. One of the great historic cities of Germany, Nuremberg is now an important commercial, industrial, and transportation...

9) wood carving. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...The woods used vary greatly in hardness and grain. The most commonly employed woods include boxwood, pine, pear, walnut, willow, oak, and ebony. The tools are simple...

10) German art and architecture. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...German art and architecture, artistic works produced within the region that became politically unified as Germany in 1871 generally followed the stylistic currents...

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