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Search Results for “eq'n”
 
 
1) Eq'uipage (3 syl.). Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898
...Tea equipage. A complete tea-service. To equip means to arm or furnish, and equipage is the furniture of a military man or body of troops. Hence camp equipage (all...

2) EQ 1. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...Intelligence regarding the emotions, especially in the ability to monitor one's own or others' emotions and to interact effectively with others. e(motional) q(uotient)....

3) EQ 2. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...educational quotient...

4) eq. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...1. equal 2. equation 3. equivalent...

5) equisetum. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...Inflected forms: pl. eq·ui·se·tums or eq·ui·se·ta (-t) See horsetail. Latin equisaetum, horsetail : equus, horse; see ekwo- in Appendix I + saeta, bristle, stiff...

6) educational quotient. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...abbr. EQ A measure of the effectiveness of an educational system, based on factors such as funding, graduation rate, standardized test scores, and student to teacher...

7) equity. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...The state, quality, or ideal of being just, impartial, and fair. 2. Something that is just, impartial, and fair. 3. Law a. Justice applied in circumstances covered...

8) inequity. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...Inflected forms: pl. in·eq·ui·ties1. Injustice; unfairness. 2. An instance of injustice or unfairness: discerned some inequities in the criminal justice system....

9) equerry. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...British royal household. 2. An officer charged with supervision of the horses belonging to a royal or noble household. French ecurie, stable, from Old French escurie,...

10) Nag. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898
...Taylor (1630) has naggon, as- 1 "Wert thou George with thy naggon, That foughtest with the draggon." Shakespeare s naunt and nuncle are mine-aunt and mine-uncle....

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