Search Results > 1-10 of 45 relevant results
NEXT  
Search Results for “accentual”
 
 
1) accentual. The American HeritageŽ Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...1. Of or relating to accent. 2. Based on stress accents: accentual rhythm; accentual verse. From Latin accentus, accent. See accent.acˇcentuˇalˇly -ADVERB...

2) accent. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...given a particular sound, called prosodic systems in linguistics. There are three basic accentual methods: stress, tone, and length. In English each word has at least...

3) meter 1. The American HeritageŽ Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...1a. The measured arrangement of words in poetry, as by accentual rhythm, syllabic quantity, or the number of syllables in a line. b. A particular arrangement of words...

4) proclitic. The American HeritageŽ Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...to the beginning of another word. Of or relating to a proclitic or proclisis; forming an accentual unit with the following word. New Latin procliticus : pro-2 + Late...

5) Nonnus. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...a collection of legends about Dionysus, has innovations in meter that predict the later accentual versification. He is probably also the author of a hexameter version...

6) clitic. The American HeritageŽ Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...on its own and attaches in pronunciation to a stressed word, with which it forms a single accentual unit. Examples of clitics are the pronoun em in I see em and the...

7) arsis. The American HeritageŽ Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...in quantitative verse. b. The accented or long part of a metrical foot, especially in accentual verse. 2. Music The upbeat or unaccented part of a measure. Middle...

8) enclitic. The American HeritageŽ Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
...pronoun 'em is an enclitic. 2. A clitic. Of or relating to an enclitic or enclisis; forming an accentual unit with the preceding word. Late Latin encliticus, from...

9) rhyme. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...and Romans. With the decline of the classical quantitative meters and the substitution of accentual meters, rhyme began to develop, especially in the sacred Latin...

10) §15. Later prosodists. VII. The Prosody of the Nineteenth Century. Vol. 13. The Victorian Age, Part One. The Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes. 1907–21
...prosodic part of Abbott s A Shakespearian Grammar, in which strict syllabic, and strict accentual, doctrines are combined in the most peremptory fashion. In the next...

Search for books related to your query at Amazon.com:
Search Now:         


NEXT  
 

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors
Search by Thunderstone