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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
Rhea Silvia’s Dream
By Ennius (239–169 B.C.)
 
          The tenderest passage extant seems modeled on a briefer sketch in Io’s account of her own sorrows, in Æschylus’s ‘Prometheus.’ The Vestal Rhea Silvia has been startled by a prophetic dream:—

RAISING her trembling body, the crone with a light had approached her:
This is the tale she affrighted relates, when roused from her slumber:—
“Daughter of Eurydicè, by our father dearly beloved,
Force and life are wholly from out my body departed!
Ay, for it seemed that a goodly man amid beautiful willows        5
Bore me by banks of rivers and unknown places. Thereafter,
Sister mine, in solitude—so I fancied—I wandered:
Slowly I sought thee, with wistful heart, but could not descry thee,
Tracing thy feet; for nowhere a pathway guided my footsteps.
Then in these words, and aloud, methought my father addressed me:        10
‘O my daughter, for thee is first great sorrow appointed:
Then in turn shall fortune revisit thee, out of the river.’
Such were my father’s words, O sister, and then he departed,
Suddenly, nor was he seen by me, though heartily longed for:
Not though often my hands to the azure expanses of heaven        15
I with tears held forth, and in loving accents addressed him:—
Then, with pain, from my weary heart had slumber departed.”
 
 
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