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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
The Trojan Elders and Helen
By Homer (fl. 850 B.C.)
 
From the Iliad, iii. 149–160: Translation of John Stuart Blackie

THESE elders sate beside the gate, where passed that wondrous fair.
Them hoary eld had loosed from fight, but their voice was clear and strong,
With mellow wisdom’s word of might, to sway the Trojan throng;
Like the blithe cricket on the tree, that stirs the leafy bower
With tremulous floods of whirring glee, in the bright and sunny hour,        5
Close by the gate these elders sate, and looked down from the tower.
And when they saw the lovely Helen tread the path below,
They from their breast forth sent the winged words, and whispered so:
Soothly nor Trojan men nor Greeks should reap great crop of blame,
That they did suffer sorrow and teen so long for such a dame,        10
Who like a goddess walks—not one from mortal womb who came.
Nathless we wish her gentle speed, across the briny waters,
That she no more may mischief breed, to our blameless sons and daughters.
 
 
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