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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
To a Friend
By Matthew Arnold (1822–1888)
 
WHO prop, thou ask’st, in these bad days, my mind?—
He much, the old man, who, clearest-souled of men,
  Saw The Wide Prospect, and the Asian Fen,
And Tmolus hill, and Smyrna bay, though blind.
Much he, whose friendship I not long since won,        5
  That halting slave, who in Nicopolis
Taught Arrian, when Vespasian’s brutal son
  Cleared Rome of what most shamed him. But he his
My special thanks, whose even-balanced soul,
  From first youth tested up to extreme old age,        10
    Business could not make dull, nor passion wild;
Who saw life steadily, and saw it whole;
  The mellow glory of the Attic stage,
    Singer of sweet Colonus, and its child.
 
 
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