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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
A Soldier’s Bride
By Ovid (43 B.C.–18 A.D.)
 
Laodamia

Translation of Emma Garland

AH! Trojan women (happier far than we),
Fain in your lot would I partaker be!
If ye must mourn o’er some dead hero’s bier,
And all the dangers of the war are near,
With you at least the fair and youthful bride        5
May arm her husband, in becoming pride;
Lift the fierce helmet to his gallant brow,
And with a trembling hand his sword bestow;
With fingers all unused the weapon brace,
And gaze with fondest love upon his face!        10
How sweet to both this office she will make,—
How many a kiss receive, how many take!
When all equipped she leads him from the door,
Her fond commands how oft repeating o’er:
“Return victorious, and thine arms enshrine—        15
Return, beloved, to these arms of mine!”
Nor shall these fond commands be all in vain:
Her hero-husband will return again.
Amid the battle’s din and clashing swords
He still will listen to her parting words;        20
And if more prudent, still, ah! not less brave,
One thought for her and for his home will save.
 
 
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