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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
Soliloquy of Teura
Tahitian Literature
 
A Beauty, Asked to Wed Punu, an Old Chief

Translation of John LaFarge

THE GOLDEN rays of the sky grow wider and wider.
What is this wind, Teura, that makes the shadows fall upon thee?
Thy heart beats fast, Teura; it takes away thy breath.
I see a rock approaching: it is my lord Punu Teraiatua.
I hurry with fright, I fall paralyzed with fear of his love.        5
I step and I stop; I should advance, and I hesitate.
I would give myself up to death at the cave Tiare.
In what way can I find death?
Oh to die six deaths! I would give a golden leaf glistening like the sky
Rather than that his love should come to me Teura.        10
There are but seven times for love and eight for death.
I am ill, aweary, fretting at the love that is given me.
I would rather die than return it.
 
 
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