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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
Man in Harmony with Nature
By Jones Very (1813–1880)
 
THE FLOWERS I pass have eyes that look at me,
  The birds have ears that hear my spirit’s voice,
And I am glad the leaping brook to see,
  Because it does at my light step rejoice.
Come, brothers all, who tread the grassy hill,        5
  Or wander thoughtless o’er the blooming fields,
Come, learn the sweet obedience of the will;
  Then every sight and sound new pleasure yields.
Nature shall seem another house of thine,
  When he who formed thee bids it live and play:        10
And in thy rambles e’en the creeping vine
  Shall keep with thee a jocund holiday;
And every plant and bird and insect be
Thine own companions born for harmony.
 
 
CONTENTS · GENERAL INDEX · SONGS & LYRICS · BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY
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