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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
The Holy Grail
The Arthurian Legends (Eighth to Twelfth Centuries)
 
From Malory’s ‘Morte d’Arthur’

“FAIRE knight,” said the King, “what is your name? I require you of your knighthood to tell me.”  1
  “Sir,” said Sir Launcelot, “wit ye well, my name is Sir Launcelot du Lake.”  2
  “And my name is Sir Pelles, king of the forrain countrey, and nigh cousin unto Joseph of Arithmy” [Arimathea].  3
  Then either of them made much of the other, and so they went into the castle for to take their repast. And anon there came in a dove at the window, and in her bill there seemed a little censer of gold, and therewithal there was such a savor as though all the spicery of the world had been there; and forthwithal there was upon the table all manner of meates and drinkes that they could thinke upon. So there came a damosell, passing faire and young, and she beare a vessell of gold between her hands, and thereto the king kneeled devoutly and said his prayers, and so did all that were there.  4
  “O Jesu,” said Sir Launcelot, “what may this meane?”  5
  “This is,” said King Pelles, “the richest thing that any man hath living; and when this thing goeth about, the round table shall bee broken. And wit ye well,” said King Pelles, “that this is the holy sanegreall which ye have heere seene.”  6
  So King Pelles and Sir Launcelot led their lives the most part of that day.  7
 
 
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