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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
A Witty Philosopher Rewarded
By Sa’dī (c. 1213–1291)
 
From the ‘Rose-Garden’: Translation of Edward Backhouse Eastwick

A POET went to the chief of a band of robbers and recited a panegyric upon him. He commanded them to strip off his clothes and turn him out of the village. The dogs, too, attacked him in the rear. He wanted to take up a stone, but the ground was frozen. Unable to do anything, he said, “What a villainous set are these, who have untied their dogs and tied up the stones.” The chieftain heard this from a window, and said with a laugh, “Philosopher! ask a boon of me.” He replied, “If thou wilt condescend to make me a present, bestow on me my own coat.”

  
COUPLET
From some a man might favors hope: from thee
We hope for nothing but immunity.
  
HEMISTICH
We feel thy kindness that thou lett’st us go.
  1
 
  The robber chief had compassion on him. He gave him back his coat, and bestowed on him a fur cloak in addition; and further, presented him with some dirhams.  2
 
 
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