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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
Maxims
By Sa’dī (c. 1213–1291)
 
From the ‘Rose-Garden’: Translations of the Kama Shastra Society and John T. Platts

  I SAW with my eyes in the desert,
That a slow man overtook a fast one.
A galloping horse, fleet like the wind, fell back
Whilst the camel-man continued slowly his progress.
  1
 
  Nothing is better for an ignorant man than silence; and if he were to consider it to be suitable, he would not be ignorant.  2
 
  If thou possess not the perfection of excellence,
It is best to keep thy tongue within thy mouth.
Disgrace is brought on a man by his tongue.
A walnut having no kernel will be light.
  3
 
  A fool was trying to teach a donkey,
Spending all his time and efforts in the task;
A sage observed: “O ignorant man, what sayest thou?
Fear blame from the censorious in this vain attempt.
A brute cannot learn speech from thee,
Learn thou silence from a brute.”
  4
 
  He who acquires knowledge and does not practice it, is like him who drives the plow and sows no seed.  5
 
 
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