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C.D. Warner, et al., comp.  The Library of the World’s Best Literature.
An Anthology in Thirty Volumes.  1917.
 
How Socrates Suppressed the Pryde and Hautinesse of Alcibiades
By Claudius Ælianus (c. 175–c. 235)
 
From ‘A Registre of Hystories’

SOCRATES, seeing Alcibiades puft up with pryde and broyling in ambitious behavioure (because possessor of such great wealth and lorde of so large lands) brought him to a place where a table did hang containing a discription of the worlde universall. Then did Socrates will Alcibiades to seeke out the situation of Athens, which when he found Socrates proceeded further and willed him to point out that plot of ground where his lands and lordships lay. Alcibiades, having sought a long time and yet never the nearer, sayde to Socrates that his livings were not set forth in that table, nor any discription of his possession therein made evident. When Socrates, rebuked with this secret quip: “And art thou so arrogant (sayeth he) and so hautie in heart for that which is no parcell of the world?”  1
 
 
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